Clinical References

The “lifeline” for all hemodialysis patients is the venous vascular access site, which must be cannulated three times per week during treatment. The “gold standard” for vascular access is the arteriovenous (AV) fistula, which has traditionally required open surgery to connect a patient’s native artery to a nearby vein. The AV fistula is preferred over synthetic grafts and central venous catheters because of its lower infection rate, prolonged survival, lower hospitalization rate and lower healthcare costs.1-3 And, patients with synthetic grafts or catheters have a 20% to 70% greater chance of death when compared to patients having an AV fistula.

The clinical references below detail the clinical studies, history and benefits of using an AV fistula for vascular access.

Proximal ulnar artery arteriovenous fistula inflow is an uncommon but useful vascular access option

Where Do You See Percutaneous Arteriovenous Fistula Creation Fitting Into Practices in the Next Several Years?

Thermal Resistance Anastomosis Device for the Percutaneous Creation of Arteriovenous Fistulae for Hemodialysis

The SIR 2016 Panel on Endovascular Arteriovenous Fistula Creation

Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block for Arteriovenous Hemodialysis Access Procedures

Computational fluid dynamic evaluation of the side-to-side anastomosis for arteriovenous fistula

Mapping of the snuffbox and cubital vessels for percutaneous Arterial Venous Fistula (pAVF) in dialysis patients

  1. www.fistulafirst.org.
  2. Fistula First Breakthrough Initiative: Targeting Catheter Last in Fistula First, Vassalotti et al. Seminars in Dialysis – 2012.
  3. A Practitioner’s Resource Guide to Hemodialysis Arteriovenous Fistulas, Fistula First, ESRD Network #14, 2003.

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